Frankie the Falcon

Let's Talk

Have questions about our Addiction Counseling Certificate program? Ready for the next step?

Request InfoApply Today

Contact Admissions

Certificate in Addiction Counseling

The purpose of the Addiction Counseling Certificate program is to prepare professionals for specialized clinical work with clients suffering from substance use disorders (sometimes termed addictive behaviors or chemical dependency).

Program Tracks in Human Services and Counseling

The program is intended for individuals who already have
a graduate-level background in a counseling-related field.    

The 18-credit program is designed to be completed in one academic year and is a precursor to becoming licensed as an alcohol and drug counselor (LADC) in the State of Connecticut

State requirements for licensure may be found here. In brief, they entail:

  • A counseling-related master’s degree (with at least 18 credits on counseling-related topics).

  • At least 27 credits in counseling-related subjects, including at least 18 credits in subjects specifically related to addiction counseling. The latter involves designated coursework in a number of topics, such as psychopharmacology, assessment, and treatment planning).

  • At least 2 years’ experience working with clients with addiction-related problems (this may include unpaid internships and other experience accrued before completing the master’s degree) with at least 300 hours of professional supervision/practical training.

  • A passing score on the International Certification Examination for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Counselors (AODA) administered by the International Certification and Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC), whose local affiliate is the Connecticut Certification Board (CCB).

This program consists of the 18 credits in addiction-related subjects required for licensure, including all topics specified in the regulations, and should enable students to prepare for the licensure examination.

Courses are offered in the evening, following the 8-week “module” format. Students typically attend classes on two 1-2 evenings per week.

 

The Albertus Difference

What Makes Addiction Counseling Certificate at Albertus Different?

Engaged
Students

  • Hands-on, experiential learning
  • Interdisciplinary perspectives
  • Emphasis on collaborative work

Great
Teaching

  • Personally invested professors
  • Small class sizes
  • Innovative, well-rounded programs
  • Resources and opportunities for research

Vibrant
Communities

  • Lively extracurricular activities
  • Campus-wide events
  • Service and community engagement

Successful
Outcomes

  • Active career counseling
  • Opportunity-building networks
  • Access to internships and professional experiences
Hands-On Learning

The Albertus Addiction Counseling Certificate Degree Program

The curriculum guides students from the basic science of drug action, through the roles played by drug and alcohol use and abuse in society, to the essential elements of clinical practice: all the way from understanding receptor mechanisms of chemical dependency to deciding what next to say to a troubled client. The clinical emphasis is on empirically supported treatments.

Certifiable Credentials

State of Connecticut Alcohol & Drug Counselor Certification or Licensure

Upon completion of this program, students will have completed all educational requirements for certification or licensure as an Alcohol and Drug Counselor in the State of Connecticut as well as certification by the Connecticut Certification Board (CCB), an affiliate of the IC&RC. Licensure (LADC) is available only to persons holding an appropriate master’s degree; those with lesser academic credentials may, however, pursue certification. In general, master’s degrees in counseling, psychology, social work, family therapy, human services and art therapy will be deemed appropriate as long as they include enough counseling-related coursework.

Graduates may immediately pursue the CCB credential of Counselor in Training (CIT) and will be eligible for entry-level positions as addiction counselors.

Title IV Programs

Gainful Employment with Addiction Counseling Certification

In order to be eligible for funding under the Title IV programs, an educational certificate program must prepare students for "gainful employment in a recognized occupation." Federal requirements mandate that institutions disclose gainful employment information and other statistics in relation to certificate programs.

Non-degree programs, including all certificate programs, are considered Gainful Employment Programs subject to the new regulations. Certificate programs include undergraduate certificate programs, post baccalaureate certificate programs, graduate certificate programs, and post-graduate certificate programs.

The following educational programs offered are not subject to the new Gainful Employment Program regulations:

  • Programs that lead to a degree, including associate’s degrees, bachelor’s degrees, graduate degrees, and professional degrees;
  • Programs that are at least two years in length that are fully transferable to a bachelor’s degree program;
  • Preparatory courses of study that provide course work necessary for enrollment in an eligible program;

For additional information, please read our Gainful Employment Disclosure.

Prior to signing an enrollment agreement, completing registration, or making any financial commitment to the College, all prospective Certificate in Addiction Counseling students must view the Gainful Employment Disclosure Template and submit an Acknowledgement of Receipt to the Division of Professional and Graduate Studies. For more information, please call (203) 773-5032 or email arreich@albertus.edu.

Albertus Magnus College does not currently have a debt-to-earnings (D/E) rate as determined by the Department of Education for this post-graduate certificate program.

Careers

Where Will Your Addiction Counseling Certificate Degree take You?

Possible career paths with a Certificate in Addiction Counseling Certificate include:



Licensed Addiction Counselor
Therapeutic Counselor
Substance Abuse Counselor
Licensed Drug and Alcohol Addiction Counselor
Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor
Addictions Specialist
Courses

Addiction Counseling Certificate Courses

Required Courses - 18 Credits
PY 583 Drugs and Behavior I: Basic Science This course addresses the nature of psychoactive drugs and their modes of action on the functioning of the human brain. Anatomy and localization of function in the brain will be reviewed. Major topics will include neurochemistry (e.g., neurotransmitters and receptor mechanisms), psychopharmacology (e.g., pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics), the therapeutic uses of psychotropic medications, and basic psychological processes involved in drug self-administration or abuse (e.g., opponent process theory, reinforcement, and classical conditioning). (3 credits)
PY 584 Ethical & Professional Issues in Addiction Counseling This course concerns ethical, legal, and administrative issues that confront substance abuse counselors. The use of values to inform ethical decision-making in ambiguous situations will be practiced. General principles (e.g., beneficence, professionalism in relationships, confidentiality and its limits, and recognition of the boundaries of one’s expertise) as well as specific regulatory guidelines (e.g., rules governing credentials, reimbursement, appropriate documentation, and liability) will be discussed. Case material will be used extensively to promote reflection and discussion. (1.5 credits)
PY 585 Drugs and Behavior II: Applications This course concerns the roles played by psychoactive drugs in human lives, both individually and in society. Topics include the epidemiology of substance use and misuse, diagnostic criteria for substance-related disorders, signs and symptoms of intoxication and withdrawal for different classes of drug, interactions of substance use with other disorders (medical or psychiatric), and the effects of substance use on the adaptive functioning and well-being of users, family members, and the wider community. Substances covered include alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, opiates, stimulants, sedatives, cannabinoids, hallucinogens, inhalants, and less common varieties. (3 credits)
PY 586 Culture, Gender, & Special Populations in Addictions This course concerns the many ways in which the background or identity of a client affects behavior, thinking, and emotion relative to substance use and its disorders. Cultural and religious norms and attitudes toward alcohol and other drugs, gender differences, sexual orientation issues, the presence of co-occurring disorders (e.g., MICA), and medical problems (e.g., HIV) will be considered. In addition to their impact on substance use, attention will be paid to the ways in which these factors may affect the process of counseling and the relationship between counselor and client. (1.5 credits)
PY 587 Addiction Counseling I: Core Concepts and Competencies This course begins the process of combining general counseling competence with specific knowledge and expertise in the domain of substance abuse. Different models of substance abuse or addiction as well as associated treatment approaches will be studied, compared, and evaluated. These will include broadly medical, psychological, and quasispiritual modalities. Counseling goals and strategies will be understood in terms of stages of change and client readiness. Standard interviewing techniques, psychoeducational interventions, and group dynamics will be considered. Attention also will be paid to practical issues such as record keeping, case management, and consultation with members of other helping professions. (3 credits)
PY 588 Clinical Assessment of Substance Use Disorders This course concerns routine and specialized procedures for assessment of substance use and co-occurring disorders, beginning with the elicitation of informed cooperation from clients and selection of appropriate measures. Instruments covered will include clinical and structured interviews, behavioral observation, clinician rating scales, mental status examinations, and standardized self-report and observer-rated measures of symptoms and personality traits. The use of assessment data in case formulation, the synthesis of clinical findings into clear, useful written reports, and the therapeutic presentation of assessment feedback to clients also will be emphasized. (1.5 credits)
PY 589 Addiction Counseling II: Advanced Techniques This course will introduce students to specific techniques used by substance use counselors, with primary emphasis on evidence-based treatments. Didactic and theoretical presentations will be interspersed with practical demonstrations and supervised practice of skills. The approaches taught may vary, but will include some of the following: motivational interviewing, the community reinforcement approach (with family involvement), relapse prevention training, cue exposure methods, and standard psychoeducational interventions (e.g., BASICS and/or values clarification). (3 credits)
PY 91 Treatment Planning & Evaluation in Addictions Counseling This course concerns the integration of diagnostic and other assessment findings into individualized treatment plans, the sensitive presentation of recommendations to clients, the collaborative development of treatment goals with clients, the translation of broad goals into a sequence of potentially attainable, measurable objectives, and the selection of appropriate interventions. Methods of monitoring client progress toward objectives, modifying objectives based on results or new findings, and evaluating the success of individual cases or treatment programs also will receive attention. (1.5 credits)

Interested in learning more about the diverse courses offered at Albertus?

What We will Need from you

Addiction Counseling Certificate Admission Requirements

To be admitted to the Addiction Counseling Certificate program, applicants must submit the following:

  • A completed application and a $50 non-refundable application fee
  • Official transcripts reflecting conferral of prior master's degree. All transcripts are to be submitted from the original institutions.
  • For non-native English speakers, minimum TOEFL score of 550 paper-based, 80 internet-based, or 213 computer-based
  • Proof of immunization in accordance with Connecticut State requirements
  • For applicants who intend to use Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Educational Benefits
    • Military, university and college transcripts
    • Certification of Eligibility letter or, for reservists, Notice of Basic Eligibility
    • Veteran’s Intent to Register form
  • A personal statement describing the candidate’s reasons for pursuing this credential. This statement should be between 250 and 500 words (i.e., 1– 2 pages) in length.
  • A resume or C.V.
  • Two letters of recommendation from persons who can judge the applicant’s suitability. Ideally, one of these will be from a current or former professor, the other from a current or former supervisor, but having both come from the same type of source is also acceptable.
  • A personal statement of 250-500 words (1-2 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing this credential.
  • Resume or C.V.
We have Faith in Your Future

Become Part of the Albertus Addiction Counseling Certificate Community

Have questions about Addiction Counseling Certificate? Ready for the next step?
Let us know how we can help plan your future.

Request Information

Request Addiction Counseling Certificate Undergraduate Information

Loading...
Request Information

Request Addiction Counseling Certificate Graduate Information

Loading...
Purposeful Vision & Direction

The Albertus Addiction Counseling Certificate Degree Mission Statement

The purpose of the Addiction Counseling Certificate program is to prepare professionals for specialized clinical work with clients suffering from substance use disorders (e.g., alcohol or drug abuse/dependence, sometimes termed addictive behaviors or chemical dependency). The program is intended for individuals who already have some background in a counseling-related field.

The 18-credit program is designed to be completed in one academic year and is a precursor to obtaining certification or licensure as an addiction, substance abuse, or drug and alcohol abuse counselor. Courses are offered in the evening, following the 8-week “module” format. Students typically attend classes on two evenings per week. Enrollments permitting, accepted students will be able to begin either in late August/early September or in late January. Those beginning in August/September may graduate the following May; those beginning in January should graduate in December.

The curriculum guides students from the basic science of drug action, through the roles played by drug and alcohol use and abuse in society, to the essential elements of clinical practice: all the way from understanding receptor mechanisms of chemical dependency to deciding what next to say to a troubled client. The clinical emphasis is on empirically supported treatments.

Upon completion of this program, students will have completed all educational requirements for certification or licensure as an Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LADC) in the State of Connecticut as well as certification by the Connecticut Certification Board (CCB), an affiliate of the IC&RC. Licensure, which is awarded by the Department of Public Health (DPH), also involves obtaining supervised experience and a passing score on the IC&RC examination. The clinical experience may include appropriate positions held before entering this program, possibly even prior to the master’s degree. This would be handled on an individual basis by the CCB and/or DPH.

The LADC, which enables a person to practice independently and/or to supervise less highly trained counselors, is available to persons holding an appropriate counseling-related master’s degree; those with other academic credentials may, however, pursue certification (CADC) and work under LADC supervision. In general, master’s degrees in counseling, psychology, social work, family therapy, human services and art therapy will be deemed appropriate, provided they include enough counseling-related coursework.

Graduates may immediately pursue the CCB credential of Counselor in Training (CIT) and will be eligible for entry-level positions as addiction counselors.

Copyright © Albertus Magnus College, All Rights Reserved