Graduate Degree Program

Master of Science in Education

Albertus Magnus College

30-Credit Graduate Program for Educators

The Master of Science in Education focuses on competencies related to differentiated and literacy instruction, particularly as required in work with students having special learning needs, including specific needs of the English language learner (ELL) students. The program also includes course work in multiculturalism. Candidates move through the program in an accelerated format and can complete all requirements for the thirty-credit degree in under two years.

Major Goals of the Master of Science Program

  • To place education within an ethical framework
  • To strengthen skills to teach literacy across the curriculum
  • To develop ability to use assessment to inform classroom instruction
  • To improve ability to recognize and conduct valid educational research and to incorporate research based instruction in lessons and units of instruction
  • To refine the ability and commitment to respond to differences among students and to provide instruction that enables all students to succeed

Admissions Requirements

The following will be required of all applicants accepted into the Master of Science in Education Program:

  • Bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university, with an overall grade point average of at least 2.7 (B-)
  • Valid Connecticut teaching certificate or eligibility for CT teacher certification
    (Applicants not certified may request a waiver indicating reasons for request.)
  • Completed application form and non-refundable fee of $50.00 in the form of a check made payable to Albertus Magnus College, including official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate degree work
  • Three letters of recommendation, including a character reference, and at least one academic reference (If currently teaching, a reference from a supervising administrator is encouraged.)
  • Graded piece of writing from an upper level course at the undergraduate or a previous graduate level course

Transfer Credits

Albertus Magnus College will accept a maximum of 6 graduate hours from an accredited institution toward satisfying the M.S. Ed. Program degree requirements. Such credits must have been completed prior to entrance into the program and must satisfy degree requirements. Transfer credits must have been completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better within the last five years at a regionally accredited institution. Transfer credits will be considered on an individual basis. Students must submit an official transcript showing proof of completion of the course(s) to be transferred. All requests to transfer credits must be completed prior to starting the program.

Graduation Requirements

  • Completion of all required coursework.
  • Satisfactory completion of the Capstone Sequence
  • 3.0 overall G.P.A. on a scale of 4.0. Students receiving a final grade of C- or lower in any course will be required to repeat that course.
  • Completion of all requirements within seven years of matriculation.
  • Payment of all tuition and fees.

Graduation with Honors

In this Program, to be eligible to have "With Honors" bestowed at graduation

  • The student must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.90 and above.
  • The student must receive a grade of "A" in both ED 680 Capstone Research Practicum and ED 691 Comprehensive Activity.

Curriculum

Foundation Sequence (9 credits)

ED 501 Maps of Education: Tracing the Roots of Contemporary Public Education 3 credits
ED 502 Educational Psychology: Theories, Learning, Development, and Teaching Practices 3 credits
ED 503 Educational Research 3 credits

Student Needs Sequence (18 credits)

ED 601 Language Acquisition and Structure 3 credits
ED 602 Reading and Writing as Tools for Learning 3 credits
ED 603 Assessment and Student Learning 3 credits
ED 604 Culture and Inter-group Relations 3 credits
ED 605 Differentiated Instruction in the Classroom 3 credits
ED 606 Technological Applications in the Classroom 3 credits

Capstone Sequence (3 credits)

ED 680 Capstone Research Practicum 2 credits
ED 691 Comprehensive Activity 1 credits

Course Descriptions

Foundation Sequence (9 credits)

ED 501 Maps of Education: Tracing the Roots of Contemporary Public Education
A detailed study of the historical and philosophical roots of contemporary and public education. In light of the fundamental question of why do we educate children, this course examines the educational interplay of the State, community, family, and teaching professionals in different eras and the consequences, both intended and unintended, of legislative initiatives and educational reforms. 3 credit

ED 502 Educational Psychology: Theories, Learning, Development, and Teaching Practices
This course is a study of the assumptions about learning and development that underlie various educational practices by acquainting students with different theories in both of these areas. It will provide students with opportunities to develop their problem solving skills in the context of education and psychology. Topics covered during the course will include development, learning theories, individual differences (in literacy development), problem solving, instructional objectives and methods, motivation, behavior management and the development of self-regulated learners, and assessment. 3 credits

ED 503 Educational Research
This course examines how educators can use both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis to improve the learning experience of their students. The focus is on both conducting primary research and becoming skilled critical consumers of published educational research. These skills will be cultivated further in subsequent classes all of which will prepare students to complete their Capstone Research Project successfully. 3 credits

Student Needs Sequence (18 credits)

ED 601 Language Acquisition and Structure
So much of learning is dependent on language as it appears in writing, both electronically and in hard print. The purpose of this course is to assure candidates' knowledge of how language operates so that they will be effective in teaching students to use language to learn and communicate. Special attention is paid to teaching English language learners and students with reading weakness, and planning instruction based on current research pertaining to literacy. 3 credits

ED 602 Reading and Writing as Tools for Learning
The premise of this class is that all teachers are teachers of reading and writing. Participants review current research on effective reading and writing instruction, especially as tools for learning across all content areas. In addition, attention is given to integrating reading and writing instruction in all lessons and units of study. 3 credits

ED 603 Assessment and Student Learning
Participants in this course learn how to gather information about student learning as a means of teaching students effectively and appropriately. Instruction focuses on practical application within the participants' content areas and instructional levels. Topics include Curriculum Based Measurement, progress monitoring within Science Research Based Instruction (SRBI), interpretation of norm-referenced assessments, and alternative dynamic assessments. 3 credits

ED 604 Culture and Inter-group Relations
Given the increasingly multicultural student population in American schools of the twenty-first century, it is important for all educators to become sensitive to diverse cultural contexts, and to establish classroom climates in which all students will feel they are welcome and that they have the ability to succeed. This course addresses a wide range of issues facing teachers in a multicultural society, and leads those enrolled in the course to draw parallels and contrasts between their own culture and a variety of other cultures. 3 credits

ED 605 Differentiated Instruction in the Classroom
This course is based on the premise that all students can be successful. Participants study current research on the nature of differentiated instruction and consider various possibilities for application of this research in typical classrooms in both urban and suburban environments. Among other considerations, course content includes a definition of differentiated instruction as both learner and knowledge-centered, and an investigation of various strategies suggested by current research for differentiating both content and skills instruction. 3 credits

ED 606 Technological Applications in the Classroom
The explosion of technology in this century has provided opportunities for innovative approaches to learning, and also to teaching. The purpose of this course is for participants to discover currently available technology for classroom use, to acquire the ability to assess quality of available technology, and to use technology as means for effective instruction. 3 credits

Capstone Sequence (3 credits)

ED 680 Capstone Research Practicum
All those enrolled in this course will work with a project advisor. Following the selection of a project and its development the candidate will work it into a final draft to be read and assessed by a committee consisting of the candidate's advisor and two other members of the graduate faculty. Prerequisites: All course requirements within the program. 2 credits

ED 691 Comprehensive Activity
Candidates will work with an advisor to determine a focus for a reflective summary of the entire program, and to select the means by which to demonstrate how every course in the program has resulted in the candidate's improved teaching practices. 1 credits

Faculty

Joan Venditto - Director
Associate Professor of Education
B.A., Albertus Magnus College
M.A., Middlebury College
Doctor of Arts, Carnegie Mellon University

Email: jvenditto@albertus.edu
Phone: 203.773.8087
Office: Weldon Hall, Room 202

Loel Tronsky
Associate Professor of Psychology and Education
B.A., Dartmouth College
M.S., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Email: ltronsky@albertus.edu
Phone: 203.773.8561
Office: Weldon Hall, Room 203

Joseph Veth
Associate Professor of Education
B.S., Fordham University
M.A., Maryknoll School of Theology
Ph.D., University of Connecticut

Email: jveth@albertus.edu
Phone: 203.773.8572
Office: Weldon Hall Room 201

Donna V. Pallanti
Certification Officer  
B.A., Albertus Magnus College
M.A., Trinity College
Sixth Year Certificate, Southern Connecticut State University

Email: dpallanti@albertus.edu
Phone: 203-773-4421
Office: Weldon Hall, Room 102

Saylor Heidmann
Instructional Coordinator Advanced Alternative Program/Literacy
A.B. Wittenberg University
M.S. Purdue University

Email: sheidmann@albertus.edu
Phone: 203-773-4421
Office: Weldon Hall, Room 102