Undergraduate Degree Program

Courses

Biology

BI 111 General Biology I
The goal of this course is to familiarize the student with fundamental principles which govern all organisms. Topics introduced include biological themes illustrated throughout the semester, cell structure and physiology, Darwinian evolution, and genetics. General Education choice, Level A. To be taken in conjunction with BI 111L. Scheduled each fall term. P: High school biology. 3 credits

BI 112 General Biology II
This course is a continuation of General Biology I with the introduction to plant life, and a comparative approach to various organ systems. What is an animal? What are the various modes of nutrition? What evolutionary steps have organisms made to become more efficient at surviving? What organ systems have they exploited? Their physiology, maintenance of homeostasis and the relationships the systems have to each other will be explored. To be taken in conjunction with BI 112L. Scheduled each spring semester. 3 credits

BI 111L, BI 112L General Biology I, II Laboratories
BI 111L uses a series of laboratory exercises designed to provide hands-on experience in addressing various biological principals and to introduce the scientific method of experimental design. BI 112L explores the anatomy and physiology of selected organisms through dissection-based activities. One three-hour laboratory period per week. To be taken in conjunction with BI 111 and BI 112 respectively. 1 credit each.

BI 116 The Human Body
A non-majors course designed to provide a fundamental background in human biology and to serve as a basic introduction to the anatomy and physiology of humans. Emphasis is placed on examining the functions of various systems and their relationships to each other. Hands-on activities may be offered during the course giving the student a chance to experience the wonders of the human body for themselves. General Education choice, Level A. P: High school biology or permission of the instructor. 3 credits

BI 205 Special Topics
An in-depth study of a selected topic in Biology.

BI 215 Microbiology
This introductory-level course concentrates on fundamental functional and structural characteristics of microscopic organisms: bacteria, viruses, and lower eucaryotic species comprising the fungi, protozoa, and algae. Categorical features related to morphology, genetics, and metabolic processes will be studied. The course also highlights the importance of these groups of organisms as causative agents of infectious diseases and as powerful genetic tools in research. Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112. 3 credits

BI 215L Microbiology Laboratory
Offered in conjunction with BI 215. Students gain experience in basic laboratory techniques that demonstrate the isolation and culturing of microbes, morphological traits of select microorganisms, and the exchange of genetic material between microbial cells. Biochemical assays that differentiate metabolic functions and enzymatic activities of bacterial and fungal species are introduced. The course provides training in the formatting and detailing of laboratory reports that review the experimental exercises. Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112. 3 hours. 1 credit

BI 216 Cell Biology
This course addresses life at the cellular level. Topics include the composition and physiology of major organelles, the mechanisms of energy production, storage and utilization, signal transduction, cancer, cell migration, and adhesion. Offered in fall semester. P: BI 111, BI 112. 3 credits

BI 216L Cell Biology Laboratory
This course includes exercises employing methods commonly used in studying areas in cell biology. Laboratory techniques include mammalian cell culture, DNA/protein electrophoresis, bacterial transformation, protein expression, and purification. To be taken in conjunction with BI216. 3 hours. 1 credit

BI 310 Genetics
This course is designed to introduce the student to DNA and its roles in the forming of genes, heredity, and the variation of organisms. Mendelian genetics, fundamental molecular genetics, and the genetic basis of evolution are included as well. P: BI 111, BI 112. 3 credits

BI 310L Genetics Laboratory
Laboratory exercises include DNA/protein electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), restriction enzyme analysis, computer-based image analysis, and the manipulation of selected model organisms. To be taken in conjunction with BI 310. 3 hours. 1 credit

BI 312 Developmental Biology
The study of fundamental processes shared by organisms as they undergo the transition from a single-celled zygote to a multicellular adult. Topics include gametogenesis, fertilization, embryogenesis (cleavage, gastrulation, neurulation, organogenesis), cellular differentiation, pattern formation, and the aspects shared by both development and cancer. P: BI 111, BI 112, BI 216. 3 credits

BI 312L Developmental Biology Lab
Selected model organisms are examined in the laboratory (zebra fish, chick, F9 teratocarcinoma). To be taken in conjunction with BI 312. 3 hours. 1 credit

BI 313 Human Physiology
An in-depth course designed to study aspects of human anatomy and physiology. This course is recommended for students interested in continuing their studies in biology, especially those intending to apply to graduate or professional programs. It provides a more detailed study of human systems and their functions. P: BI 111, BI 112. 3 credits

BI 313L Human Physiology Laboratory
Laboratory exercises involve measuring and assessing different physiological responses and parameters. To be taken with BI 313. 3 hours. 1 credit

Chemistry

CH 121 General Chemistry I
A study of matter and atomic structure, mass-mole relationships, reaction stoichiometry, solution chemistry including redox and precipitation reactions, the Theory of gas laws, electronic structure and the Periodic table of elements, covalent bonding and thermochemistry. General Education choice, Level A. Scheduled each fall semester. P: Background in Mathematics equivalent to Algebra II. 3 credits

CH 121L General Chemistry I Laboratory
Laboratory experiments which correlate with General Chemistry I lecture. General laboratory incorporating qualitative and quantitative techniques such as titrations, filtrations and chromatography will be included. To be taken in conjunction with CH 121. 1 credit

CH 122 General Chemistry II
Course includes studies in liquids, solids and intermolecular bonding, concentration units and colligative properties, chemical kinetics, equilibrium in gaseous systems, acid and bases, acid-base theory and equilibria studies (including buffers and titrations), precipitation equilibria, coordination compounds, spontaneity of reactions, electrochemistry, and nuclear reactions (time permitting). Scheduled each fall semester. P: CH 121. 3 credits

CH 122L General Chemistry II Laboratory
Laboratory experiments which correlate with CH 122 lecture. Laboratory experiments include basic analytical techniques: titrations, gravimetry, spectroscopy and electrochemistry. To be taken in conjunction with CH 122. 1 credit

CH 221 (W) Organic Chemistry I
This course focuses on fundamentals of structure and bonding in organic compounds. Study of the structure, properties, preparation, reactions, and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, and alkyl halides. Includes stereochemistry of organic compounds; nucleophilic substitution reactions. This is a writing intensive (W) course. Scheduled each fall semester. P: CH 122. 3 credits

CH 221L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
Laboratory experiments correlated with Organic Chemistry I lecture. Introduction to various organic laboratory techniques including distillation, reflux, extractions, recrystallization, chromatography, qualitative analysis, and laboratory safety (and related matters). Experiments include paper and thin-layer chromatography, elimination, nucleophilic substitution, and addition reactions. P: CH 122, CH 122L. 1 credit

CH 222 Organic Chemistry II
Study of the structure, properties, preparation, reactions, and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds including alkadienes, arenes, organometallics, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, amines, and various other derivative groups. Basic theory of spectroscopic methods NMR, UV, IR and MS will be introduced and spectral interpretation of organic compounds emphasized. Scheduled each spring semester. P: CH 221. 3 credits

CH 222L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
Laboratory experiments correlated with Organic Chemistry II lecture. Experiments will incorporate spectroscopic analysis (NMR, UV, IR and MS) with synthesis and organic reaction experiments such as oxidation-reduction, esterification, and nucleophilic substitution reactions. Scheduled each spring semester. P: CH 221L. 1 credit

CH 241 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry I (Laboratory, CH241L)
This course includes the analysis of data in analytical chemistry, basic statistics, stoichiometrytitrations, gravimetry, complexometry, electrochemistry, voltammetry and electrochemical sensors, spectrochemical techniques-atomic absorption, chromatography-theory and applications-column, TLC, GC, HPLC, ion-exchange, electrophoresis, clinical chemistry. Laboratory experiments will incorporate lecture material emphasizing data collection (and analysis) and the analytical techniques. To be taken in conjunction with lab. Some experiments may be miniprojects. P: CH 222, 222L. Lecture: 2 hours per week; Laboratory: 6 hours per week. 3 credits. CH241L 1 credit.

CH 242 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry II (Laboratory, CH242L)
Introduction to theory and use of modern chemical instrumentation techniques including titrations (acid-base, complexometric), spectroscopy (UV, IR, AAS), electrochemistry, chromatography (GC, HPLC), and other techniques. To be taken in conjunction with lab. P: CH 222, 222L, CH 241. Lecture: 2 hours per week; Laboratory: 6 hours per week. 3 credits. CH242L 1 credit

CH 321 Physical Chemistry I (Laboratory, CH 321L)
A study of the theoretical principles underlying the areas of thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy. To be taken in conjunction with lab. P: CH 122, SC132, MA 122. 3 credits. CH 321L 1 credit.

CH 322 Physical Chemistry II (Laboratory, CH 322L))
Study of a quantitative approach to statistical mechanics, quantum chemistry, kinetics, macroscopic and microscopic structures. To be taken in conjunction with lab. P: CH 321. 3 credits. CH322L 1 credit.

CH 324 Biochemistry
Study of the structure and function of complex macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates. Intermolecular interactions and regulatory mechanisms that control these interactions will be examined. Cellular metabolism and a quantitative analysis of certain biochemical reactions will also be covered. Scheduled each fall semester. P: BI 111, BI 112, BI 111L, BI112L, CH 221, and CH 222. BI 216 is strongly recommended. 3 credits

CH 324L Biochemistry Laboratory
Offered in conjunction with CH 324. Experimental techniques are aimed at extracting and quantitating nucleic acids and proteins from cells. Purified macromolecules are analyzed using a combination of chromatographic, electrophoretic, and immunobiological methods. Students gain proficiency in operating equipment and instruments commonly found in a biochemical laboratory. The course also includes visits to off-campus sites engaged in advanced and highly specialized biochemical experimentation. 3 hours. 1 credit.

Science

SC 105 Special Topics
A non-majors course designed to examine different aspects of science. Topics will vary depending on the instructors areas of expertise. Field studies may be involved along with some hands-on learning. Students will gain an understanding of the scientific method along with techniques in data analysis and presentation. General Education choice Level A. 3 credits

SC 108 Frontiers of Science
This is a non-majors course that introduces general principles of biology though the examination of issues and concerns of current importance to the general public. Topics studied include, but are not limited to, biotechnology, genetic engineering, human health and disease. Through the exploration of highly debatable subjects, students gain an understanding of how the scientific method is applied to resolving questions and unanswered problems. General Education choice Level A. Scheduled each semester. No prerequisites. 3 credits

SC 114 Nutrition for Health and Fitness: The Science of Wellness
This course provides a comprehensive introduction into the vital role nutrition plays in enhancing one’s health and fitness. Throughout the course students will be exposed to current research and literature along with practical activities. Topics studied will include, but are not limited to, the basic principles of nutrition, our energy systems and energy yielding nutrients, vitamins, minerals and body weight loss/gain through proper nutrition and exercise. This course will also provide insight on nutrition for fitness as well as throughout the life cycle. Bon appétit! General Education Choice, Level A. 3 credits

SC 131 General Physics I
The study of selected topics, e.g. motion, force, work, energy and thermodynamics using algebra and trigonometry. Laboratory exercises will illustrate these principles. This course is a requirement for students preparing for teaching certification in Biology or Chemistry. P: high school physics, algebra or departmental permission. Offered fall semester of even years. 3 credits

SC 131L General Physics I Laboratory
Offered in conjunction with SC 131, this course illustrates selected topics through hands-on work. 3 hours. 1 credit

SC 132 General Physics II
The study of the fundamental principles of sound, electricity, magnetism, optics and atomic physics. Laboratory exercises will illustrate these principles. Offered spring semester of odd years. P: SC 131 or departmental permission. 3 credits

SC 132L General Physics II Laboratory
Offered in conjunction with SC 132, this course illustrates selected topics through hands-on work. 3 hours. 1 credit

SC 201 (W) Science Writing
This course is designed for science majors to improve their communication skills in science, mainly the writing and reporting abilities. The course will emphasize comprehension and writing skills in science (biology and chemistry) through interpretation and analysis of scientific information from scientific journals, various writing assignments as well as oral and poster presentations. The course will also discuss methods in literature search, plagiarism and letter writing (CVs, cover letters, etc). Students will learn to develop effective writing techniques that are clear, concise and understandable yet compelling. Effective writing in science should prepare them for their professional writing needs in their future science careers. This is a writing intensive (W) course. Offered when there is sufficient demand. 2 credits

SC 302 Practicum/Internship
Program of supervised practical experience in an external setting related to students’ interest. P: Permission of Department Chair. 3 to 6 credits

SC 327 Independent Research
Experimental research under the supervision of a member of the Biology or Chemistry faculty. P: Permission of Instructor. 2 to 4 credits

SC 340 Advanced Topics
An in-depth study of a selected topic in Biology or Chemistry. Topic chosen will be compatible with students’ interests and instructor’s expertise. P: instructor permission. 3 credits

SC 351 Senior Science Seminar I
Students examine current research advances by reviewing reports in the scientific literature. Experimental techniques used in the research laboratory are studied in-depth. Course structure involves instruction on the use of literature databases and studentpresentations. Offered each fall semester. P: Senior status or instructor permission. 1 credit

SC 352 Senior Science Seminar II
Extension of SC 351. Students focus on a single research area of their choosing, conducting a thorough analysis of the pertinent literature and formulating questions for future study in the field. The student is guided in the preparation of a written research proposal that details an experimental approach to address the identified questions. The course is designed to demonstrate a senior student’s breadth of scientific knowledge and use of the scientific method. Scheduled each spring semester. P: Completion of SC 351 or instructor permission. 1 credit