Curriculum

English Major (36 Credits)

EN 225 Masterpieces of American Literature I

This introductory survey traces the development of a distinctly American literary tradition in relation to questions of national identity, selfhood, gender, and race. Drawn from contact and colonial writing through the ante-bellum period, readings may include Native American myths; exploration and captivity narratives; religious writing; poems by Bradstreet, Taylor, Whittier, and Longfellow; autobiographies by Franklin and Douglass; essays by Emerson and Thoreau; fiction by Hawthorne, Poe, and Melville. 3 credits

EN 226 Masterpieces of American Literature II

The second part of Masterpieces of American Literature introduces students to major American achievements in poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fictional prose from post-Civil War era through the second half of the twentieth century. Readings may include the poetry of Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, Stevens, Hughes, and Bishop; the fiction of James, Twain, Wharton, and Faulkner; the drama of O’Neill and Williams; the prose of Washington and DuBois. 3 credits

EN 227 Masterworks of British Literature I

Introduces students to the treasures of British literature: the tales of Chaucer; sonnets of Shakespeare; poems of Sidney, Spenser, Donne, Marvell, Milton, Dryden, Pope; essays of Swift and Samuel Johnson. Making use of some of the most beautiful and suggestive literary texts in English, this course helps students to become confident and responsive readers of literature. 3 credits

EN 228 Masterworks of British Literature II

The second half of Masterworks of British Literature explores selections from among the prose and poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats; the works of Tennyson, Arnold, the Brownings, Ruskin, Mill, Newman, Carlyle, Pater; and such modern poets as Yeats, Eliot, Auden, and Heaney. 3 credits

EN 317 Literary Theory and Criticism

What is literature? Who decides what we should read and why? How should we read a literary text? These are just a few of the questions about literature that this course will explore. Focusing on one major literary text, students will learn to apply a variety of critical perspectives to their reading and be introduced to the practice of literary criticism and major contemporary critical theories. 3 credits

EN 391 Senior Seminar in British and American Literature

This is the culminating seminar for English majors which invites in-depth study of selected seminal literary texts. Past seminars have focused on the question: How does reading and knowing poets of the past relate to our reading and knowing of poets of our own time? Generally offered every year. 3 credits

One course from the following:

EN 283, 284 Shakespeare I, II

These two courses, which can be taken together or separately, explore the literary and theatrical genius of one of the world’s greatest and most controversial artists. We will read, discuss, and watch performances (both film and live) of Shakespeare’s major plays. EN 283 focuses on the turbulent history plays (Richard II, Henry IV Part I and Part II, Henry V); sparkling romantic comedies (A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It); and two of the most popular and poignant tragedies (Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet). EN 284 focuses on three great tragedies (Macbeth, Othello, King Lear); two mind-bending, problematic plays (Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure); and the fas ci nat ing and beautiful final plays (The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest). Generally offered every other year. 3 credits each

EN 383 Shakespeare Seminar

This seminar, designed for students who have some previous college experience of Shakespeare, offers an opportunity to study, compare, and perform scenes from a small number of Shakespeare’s plays, in conjunction with a staged production, whenever possible. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

15 credits of English electives

Creative Writing (36 credits)

EN 143 Introduction to Creative Writing (may be waived with permission of Department Chair or Director of Creative Writing Concentration).

A writing course designed as a general introduction to the strategies of literary composition. Through sustained and systematic practice in the techniques that stimulate and refine creative writing, students will exercise and develop intuitive and critical abilities essential to significant artistic achievement. Generally offered once a year. 3 credits

EN 225 Masterpieces of American Literature I

This introductory survey traces the development of a distinctly American literary tradition in relation to questions of national identity, selfhood, gender, and race. Drawn from contact and colonial writing through the ante-bellum period, readings may include Native American myths; exploration and captivity narratives; religious writing; poems by Bradstreet, Taylor, Whittier, and Longfellow; autobiographies by Franklin and Douglass; essays by Emerson and Thoreau; fiction by Hawthorne, Poe, and Melville. 3 credits

EN 226 Masterpieces of American Literature II

The second part of Masterpieces of American Literature introduces students to major American achievements in poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fictional prose from post-Civil War era through the second half of the twentieth century. Readings may include the poetry of Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, Stevens, Hughes, and Bishop; the fiction of James, Twain, Wharton, and Faulkner; the drama of O’Neill and Williams; the prose of Washington and DuBois. 3 credits

EN 227 Masterworks of British Literature I

Introduces students to the treasures of British literature: the tales of Chaucer; sonnets of Shakespeare; poems of Sidney, Spenser, Donne, Marvell, Milton, Dryden, Pope; essays of Swift and Samuel Johnson. Making use of some of the most beautiful and suggestive literary texts in English, this course helps students to become confident and responsive readers of literature. 3 credits

EN 228 Masterworks of British Literature II

The second half of Masterworks of British Literature explores selections from among the prose and poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats; the works of Tennyson, Arnold, the Brownings, Ruskin, Mill, Newman, Carlyle, Pater; and such modern poets as Yeats, Eliot, Auden, and Heaney. 3 credits

EN 244a/b Creative Writing: Poetry, Short Fiction, Short Theater Pieces

This course invites students with a serious interest in writing to compose various forms of poetry, short fiction, and/or theater pieces. Through weekly writing and class workshops, this course helps students discover material, find and develop an authentic voice, and experiment with different kinds of writing. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

EN 317 Literary Theory and Criticism

What is literature? Who decides what we should read and why? How should we read a literary text? These are just a few of the questions about literature that this course will explore. Focusing on one major literary text, students will learn to apply a variety of critical perspectives to their reading and be introduced to the practice of literary criticism and major contemporary critical theories. 3 credits

EN 391 Senior Seminar in British and American Literature

This is the culminating seminar for English majors which invites in-depth study of selected seminal literary texts. Past seminars have focused on the question: How does reading and knowing poets of the past relate to our reading and knowing of poets of our own time? Generally offered every year. 3 credits

One course from the following:

EN 283, 284 Shakespeare I, II

These two courses, which can be taken together or separately, explore the literary and theatrical genius of one of the world’s greatest and most controversial artists. We will read, discuss, and watch performances (both film and live) of Shakespeare’s major plays. EN 283 focuses on the turbulent history plays (Richard II, Henry IV Part I and Part II, Henry V); sparkling romantic comedies (A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It); and two of the most popular and poignant tragedies (Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet). EN 284 focuses on three great tragedies (Macbeth, Othello, King Lear); two mind-bending, problematic plays (Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure); and the fas ci nat ing and beautiful final plays (The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest). Generally offered every other year. 3 credits each

EN 383 Shakespeare Seminar

This seminar, designed for students who have some previous college experience of Shakespeare, offers an opportunity to study, compare, and perform scenes from a small number of Shakespeare’s plays, in conjunction with a staged production, whenever possible. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

Three of the following courses (9 credits):

EN 245a/b The Composing Process

Making use of class exercises, workshops, and individual conferences, this course will guide students to discovering materials, affecting audiences, and writing creatively with clarity and power. Generally offered every year. 3 credits

EN 343a/b Seminar in Poetry Writing

This seminar explores and develops students’ interest in different kinds of poetic forms. It includes a final portfolio in the form of a collection of poems or a single long poem. Students can expect to submit their more accomplished work to various literary publications (including Breakwater) and poetry competitions. P: EN 244a/b or permission of instructor. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

EN 344a/b Seminar in Fiction Writing

An intensive class in composing and evaluating short stories and longer fiction. Students will work on a variety of brief exercises and one major project in narrative composition. P: EN 244a/b or permission of instructor. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

EN 345a/b Seminar in Composing Autobiography

This seminar uses readings, class exercises, and workshop activities to help students begin the process of exploring different versions of writing one’s self as a literary text. Issues addressed include becoming the “author” of oneself; autobiography as the “rewriting” of the self; confession and deception as “autobiographical” impulses; the relation between autobiography and fiction. Students compose autobiographical poems or narratives as their final portfolio project. P: EN 143 or permission of the Department Chair. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

EN 346a/b Seminar in Playwriting

This seminar introduces the student to different kinds of dramatic texts and encourages experimentation in more than one theatrical mode. Students will complete either a one act play or several scenes from a work-in-progress by the end of the course. If possible, completed dramatic texts written by members of the class will be given workshop productions. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

EN 392 Writing Seminar

This advanced course is aimed at preparing upperclass students to meet successfully the kinds of writing they will encounter in the work place and in graduate study. After an intensive review of the stylistic and other formal aspects of business, technical, journalistic, and scholarly writing, students will concentrate on writing projects keyed to their career plans. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

(NOTE: Students may take a second session of any creative writing course above the introductory level (EN 143). The letters “a/b” following the course numbers indicate the first (“a”) and the second (“b”) semester for which a student enrolls in a course so designated.)

Dramatic Studies (36 credits)

EN 225 Masterpieces of American Literature I

This introductory survey traces the development of a distinctly American literary tradition in relation to questions of national identity, selfhood, gender, and race. Drawn from contact and colonial writing through the ante-bellum period, readings may include Native American myths; exploration and captivity narratives; religious writing; poems by Bradstreet, Taylor, Whittier, and Longfellow; autobiographies by Franklin and Douglass; essays by Emerson and Thoreau; fiction by Hawthorne, Poe, and Melville. 3 credits

EN 226 Masterpieces of American Literature II

The second part of Masterpieces of American Literature introduces students to major American achievements in poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fictional prose from post-Civil War era through the second half of the twentieth century. Readings may include the poetry of Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, Stevens, Hughes, and Bishop; the fiction of James, Twain, Wharton, and Faulkner; the drama of O’Neill and Williams; the prose of Washington and DuBois. 3 credits

EN 227 Masterworks of British Literature I

Introduces students to the treasures of British literature: the tales of Chaucer; sonnets of Shakespeare; poems of Sidney, Spenser, Donne, Marvell, Milton, Dryden, Pope; essays of Swift and Samuel Johnson. Making use of some of the most beautiful and suggestive literary texts in English, this course helps students to become confident and responsive readers of literature. 3 credits

EN 228 Masterworks of British Literature II

The second half of Masterworks of British Literature explores selections from among the prose and poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats; the works of Tennyson, Arnold, the Brownings, Ruskin, Mill, Newman, Carlyle, Pater; and such modern poets as Yeats, Eliot, Auden, and Heaney. 3 credits

EN 317 Literary Theory and Criticism

What is literature? Who decides what we should read and why? How should we read a literary text? These are just a few of the questions about literature that this course will explore. Focusing on one major literary text, students will learn to apply a variety of critical perspectives to their reading and be introduced to the practice of literary criticism and major contemporary critical theories. 3 credits

EN 391 Senior Seminar in British and American Literature

This is the culminating seminar for English majors which invites in-depth study of selected seminal literary texts. Past seminars have focused on the question: How does reading and knowing poets of the past relate to our reading and knowing of poets of our own time? Generally offered every year. 3 credits

Requirements Six additional courses must be chosen from the following. (One of these six courses must be either EN 283, EN 284, or EN 383).

EN 283, 284 Shakespeare I, II

These two courses, which can be taken together or separately, explore the literary and theatrical genius of one of the world’s greatest and most controversial artists. We will read, discuss, and watch performances (both film and live) of Shakespeare’s major plays. EN 283 focuses on the turbulent history plays (Richard II, Henry IV Part I and Part II, Henry V); sparkling romantic comedies (A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It); and two of the most popular and poignant tragedies (Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet). EN 284 focuses on three great tragedies (Macbeth, Othello, King Lear); two mind-bending, problematic plays (Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure); and the fas ci nat ing and beautiful final plays (The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest). Generally offered every other year. 3 credits each

EN 383 Shakespeare Seminar

This seminar, designed for students who have some previous college experience of Shakespeare, offers an opportunity to study, compare, and perform scenes from a small number of Shakespeare’s plays, in conjunction with a staged production, whenever possible. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

EN 230 Tragedy

This course explores the nature of tragedy by looking at recurrent patterns in plays that have haunted the imagination of generations. It intends to raise questions about the relationship between tragic drama and “the tragic vision of life” and to consider if it is possible to write tragedy today. Readings may include plays by Sophocles, Shakespeare, Shelley, Ibsen, O’Neill, Brecht, and Ionesco, as well as selected criticism. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

EN 231 Comedy

Like tragedy, comedy has its roots in ancient myth and ritual, but its spirit is one of celebration. Comedy is a genre versatile enough to encompass social commentary, psychological observations, and philosophical issues. This course focuses principally on the works of playwrights such as Aristophanes, Plautus, Shakespeare, Moliere, Congréve, Wycherley, Wilde, Shaw, Chekov, Beckett, and Pinter. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

EN 232 Modern Drama

This course introduces students to the excitement and variety of modern drama. It begins with the roots of modern drama in the nineteenth-century (Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekov, and Shaw) and continues into the present with such playwrights as O’Neill, Eliot, Miller, Williams, Beckett, Albee, and Pinter. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

EN 244a/b Creative Writing: Poetry, Short Fiction, Short Theater Pieces

This course invites students with a serious interest in writing to compose various forms of poetry, short fiction, and/or theater pieces. Through weekly writing and class workshops, this course helps students discover material, find and develop an authentic voice, and experiment with different kinds of writing. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

EN 280 Practicum

The English Department offers suitably prepared students the opportunity to apply and develop reading and composing skills in work environments such as hospital administration, marketing, publishing, television news studios, and newspaper offices. Requires permission of Department Chair, with whom hours and credits are arranged.

EN 346a/b Seminar in Playwriting

This seminar introduces the student to different kinds of dramatic texts and encourages experimentation in more than one theatrical mode. Students will complete either a one act play or several scenes from a work-in-progress by the end of the course. If possible, completed dramatic texts written by members of the class will be given workshop productions. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

EN 380 Internship

A 3 to 6 credit field work experience open only to senior majors. Requires permission of Department Chair, with whom hours and credits are to be arranged.

EN 390 Independent Study

A course of study for superior students with well-developed reading plans and research projects. Requires permission of Department Chair, with whom hours and credits are to be arranged. Generally offered every year.

EN 393 Seminar in Dramatic Literature

This seminar, required for English majors concentrating in Dramatic Studies, is open to any upperclass student with an interest in drama. The seminar focuses on several provocative issues, including the relation between classical myth and mythic tragedy; the relation of action and inaction in the theater; plays which subvert their own form; political versus apolitical theater. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits