Undergraduate Degree Program

Courses

Core Courses

CO 121 Communications Overview
How many years does the average American spend watching television during his/her life and is this time well spent? What prophecies did Marshall McLuhan make in 1965 that are becoming true today? Have books been replaced and forgotten? What does a film producer really do? What is a gatekeeper? How has the “profit motive” changed the definition of news? Does violent television programming have any affect upon society? How many ads does the average American find herself/himself exposed to each day? Are the mass media really electing the President of the United States? These are just a few of the questions we will explore in this lively course, which surveys communication theory, process, practice, and ethics. Apart from serving as an introduction to the discipline of Communications, this course is highly recommended for those students not completing the program of study in Communications. General Education Choice for Part A. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 131 The History of Mass Media
What modern social phenomenon has had greater influence upon the way we live than mass media? This course chronologically traces the development of mass media from their earliest varieties to today’s complex, technologically oriented varieties. Emphasis is upon American mass media, but some attention will be given to European and Eastern development. In addition, the cultural impact of mass media upon major historical movements (e.g. Renaissance, Reformation, the Global Village) will be explored. Apart from forming a general awareness, students are expected to research a specific media event, person, or the development of a specific mass medium within a given period of history. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 141 Speech Communications
Speech Communications offers the student a comprehensive approach to the organization, presentation, and theory associated with the practice of oral communications. Through classroom exercises, formal student speech presentations, and videotape analysis, the student will advance his/her ability to speak publicly. Special attention will be given to the perceptual skills, listening skills, and leadership styles necessary for effective speaking in family, social, and business contexts. The emphasis is upon individual development. Thus, the student who experiences “speech anxiety” is likely to find Speech Communications a particularly rewarding experience. General Education Choice for Part A. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 151 Writing for the Mass Media
All mass media, at one time or another, require the creator(s) to write. Given the essential nature of this expressive skill, Writing for the Mass Media will expose the student to the basics of news, multi-media, sports, visual, and promotional forms of writing. Students will examine different examples of these writing forms as models, and will write originally conceived copy as weekly assignments. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 220 Sociology of Communications (Same as SO 220)
Introduction to the sociological perspective of communications, especially mass communications. Distinction between mass communications and interpersonal communications. Includes language and society, models of communication processes, the nature of the audience in society, functions of mass communications in society, some comparative and historical work. P: SO 111, or permission of Department Chair. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

Promotional Communications Sequence

CO 260 Advertising Techniques
In this course, we introduce the student to the workings of modern advertising. Focusing upon the creative process in American advertising, students will submit originally conceived and prepared advertisements or advertising copy as weekly assignments. In addition, students will explore market research and media buying as allied topics. No prior skills are required, but enthusiasm and imagination are welcome prerequisites. This course is highly recommended for those wishing to pursue a career in advertising, marketing, public relations, and/or promotional communications. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 261 Public Relations
This course focuses upon the informational and promotional roles that public relations plays in commercial and non-profit sectors, and is an excellent complement to CO 260. In addition to developing a student’s writing skills, we will address employee communication, community relations, media relations, government relations and social responsibility. Problem solving and PR expressive skills are emphasized. Highly recommended for those students interested in corporate communications. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 362 Persuasion and Propaganda
What are the differences that exist between being persuasive and being a propagandist in communicating? What is a lie? Is there ever such a thing as a good lie? How do mass media historically and in the present day deceive viewers, readers, and listeners? How do corporations use media to propagate positions, policies, and products/services? How do politicians and governments persuade publics and why? These are just some of the questions students will examine in Persuasion and Propaganda. The emphasis is upon making students more aware and reflective on the uses and consequences of modern persuasive media. General Education Choice for Part C. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

Visual Communications Sequence

CO 250 Broadcast Writing
In this course, we will introduce the student to the creative variables and technical considerations involved in radio and television copywriting. The student will be expected to submit original radio and TV copy as weekly assignments. In addition, we will explore radio and TV organization and production processes. A final portfolio of original copy will be required from each student. This course is highly recommended for those interested in a career in either radio or television. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 251 Film and Video Production
In this course, we introduce the student to the principles, processes, and creative production techniques associated with narrative and documentary motion media. Using small format videotape, students will explore the following topics: scripting, production planning, budgeting, casting, directing, camera operation, lighting, sound recording, music, and editing. Students will engage in group projects that involve “hands-on” workshops. Emphasis is upon single-camera production style, but some attention will be given to multi-camera, studio-oriented production variations. Laboratory fee of $50.00. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 341 Film Appreciation
As an introduction to the study of cinema, this course focuses upon the theories, principles and expressive skills associated with film analysis. Through the examination of selected early film classics, major motion picture narratives, and film shorts, the student will learn to apply classical, auteur and genre approaches to film criticism. The student is expected to view movies outside of class meetings and to write several, short analytical reviews. The emphasis is upon “film literacy” and the ability to “read” a motion picture. General Education choice for Part C. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

Sports Communications Sequence

CO 202 Sports Marketing and Promotion
Amateur and professional sports in America are experiencing a rapid explosion for both male and female competitors. Increasingly, media outlets are presenting these contests live, or reporting on the results of these contests on a regular basis. Sports marketing and sports media are intrinsically linked in American culture. Sports Marketing and Promotion will explore a variety of topics including: Why are sports more popular today than ever before? Why have sports on a professional and collegiate level become “big business?” What effects does the business of sports have upon collegiate competition? What is sports marketing? How does one construct a marketing plan for a professional or collegiate team? How do the mass media fit into any sports marketing plan? In addition to readings, case studies, and regular assignments, students will prepare a marketing plan for a professional or collegiate athletic team or program. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 203 Sports Information and Media
Modern sports and mass media are intrinsically linked. Whether it is a major or minor league team, a collegiate athletic program, or high school athletic program, Sports media and their ability to communicate with potential fans and sponsors are an integral part of the success of teams and programs. Sports Information and Media prepares the student to work on either “side of the aisle.” Students will explore topics that address Sports Information and the coverage of sports by mass media. Students will be required to prepare original sports information and media material as regular assignments. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 301 Organizational Communications
Bureaucracies and large-sized organizational structures abound in modern America. Frankly, there is no escaping this reality. Organization Communications takes historical, structural and ethical perspectives in examining the nature and role of communications within the organizational framework. Direct attention will be given to applying these perspectives to the phenomenon of the modern sports industries, but comparative and contrasting attention will be given to large, midsize and small businesses; and to those organizations that exist in the not-for-profit sector. Although part of the Sports Communications Sequence, Organizational Communications is highly recommended for all students interested in better understanding and affecting the dynamics involved in effective communications within any organizational framework. Generally offered yearly. General Education choice for Part C. 3 credits.

Performance Communications Sequence

CO/DR 127 Fundamentals of Acting
The fundamentals of acting include basic techniques and skills. Self-awareness, choices, and observation are emphasized. General Education Choice for Part A. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO/DR 228 Acting for Stage and Screen
Development of the student’s physical and mental processes in creating objectives, developing and discovering choices, making decisions, and collaboration. The student’s fears and inhibitions are explored through personalization exercises. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO/DR 326 The Creative Mind
What marks and makes a creative mind? What is the difference between talent and creativity? Have you explored your potential as a creative person? Can we solve contemporary problems without developing our creative self? These are some of the questions explored as we develop knowledge of our creative mind. General Education choice for Part C. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

Topics Courses

CO/DR 117 Introduction to Theatre
The introduction to the study of theatre develops the student’s appreciation of and response to the theatrical event and the collaboration efforts essential to producing a quality experience. General Education A course. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO/DR 129 Art/Space Management
This course is designed for students to study and to discover how spaces are managed as facilitators of the promotion of art to the community. Offered when there is sufficient demand. 3 credits

CO 171 Introduction to Political Communications
Things get done through politics, and politics gets done through communication. Since the time of Aristotle, thinkers have recognized that politics and communication go handin-hand as essential parts of human nature. And to this day, it is still the communication process that can either nurture or starve a nation’s civil life. This introductory course will explore the interrelationship between communications and politics and how it effects the media and democracy in the United States. Questions like “Why do Americans hate government?; Why do Americans mistrust the news media?” will be explored. An examination of how American politicians, trade unions, interest groups and terrorist organizations make use of the media will also be explored. The emphasis of this course is upon communication and political awareness, and this course is highly recommended for all liberally educated students who wish to become better aware of the roles that communications and politics play in their lives. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

CO 230 Internet Marketing and Advertising
Internet marketing and promotional communications are increasing at dramatic rates. Both large and small businesses and individual entrepreneurs cannot hope to survive in the 21st Century without strong Internet marketing and advertising plans. This course will introduce the student to the basics of product/service promotion as practiced using the medium of the World Wide Web. Specifically, topics to be explored include: What is “e-business”?, Internet User Characteristics and Behavior, On-line Market Research, Product and Pricing on the Net, The Net as Distribution Channel, The Internet Marketing Plan, and Advertisement Design for the Net. Students will be expected to have Internet access and will create a variety of creative, promotional materials as regular assignments. Prior Internet design experience is desirable but not required. In addition, students will explore the ethical issues and some legal questions associated with Internet marketing and advertising. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 232 Films of Alfred Hitchcock
Alfred Hitchcock remains as one of cinema’s most prolific and well-respected directors. Using the auteur approach to cinematic analysis, students will examine Hitchcock’s works from a variety of viewpoints including: theme, character, symbolism, and directorial style. Students will view films during class meetings, participate in analytical discussions, and write several short reviews as course requirements. Students are not expected to have any prior film analysis background. The emphasis is upon awareness, perception and expression. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 233 Films of Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg is one of modern America’s most popular filmmakers. Applying the auteur approach to cinematic analysis, students will examine Spielberg’s works from a variety of viewpoints including: theme, character, symbolism, and directorial style. Students will view films during class meetings, participate in analytical discussions, and write several short reviews as course requirements. Students are not expected to have any prior film analysis background. The emphasis is upon awareness, perception, and expression. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 234 Gangster Films
America’s social history has been plagued with the presence of criminally oriented gangs. Thus, it is not surprising that so much of American cinema has explored this phenomenon. The Gangster Films course employs the genre approach to film analysis, as students view and critique a broad spectrum of films. Students will view films during class meetings, participate in analytical discussions, and write several short reviews as course requirements. Students are not expected to have any prior film analysis background. The emphasis is upon awareness, perception, and expression. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 235 Magazine Editing and Production
This course introduces the student to the practical, creative, and technical considerations involved in publishing a magazine. Specifically, students will explore magazine organizational structure, budget planning, layout and design, illustrative matter, printing and distribution, editorial planning and copyediting, and magazine promotion. In addition to examining the print magazine, the student will explore the new emerging “on-line” magazine. Attention will be given to both consumer and to business forms of magazines. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 236 Film Noir
This film study course will explore those films that constitute the “dark side of the screen.” Employing the genre approach to film analysis and criticism, students will view a variety of films during class meetings (e.g. The Maltese Falcon, The Big Sleep, High Sierra, Chinatown, Prizzi’s Honor ) and write several short reviews. These brooding, doom-laden films that emerged from Hollywood after World War II present a more cruel, disoriented, and heartless vision of America than had ever appeared before. Noir films are filled with dread, paranoia, steamy sex, double-crossing women, and menacing city settings. These settings, coupled with unusual camera angles and lighting effects, create story lines that are fascinating and reveal human nature. If you are one who likes cinema, you are certain to enjoy this distinctive genre. Students are not expected to have any prior film analysis background. The emphasis is upon awareness, perception, and expression. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 237 Photojournalism
Photojournalism introduces the student to the informational, persuasive, and entertainment roles that still images play in modern newspapers and magazines. This course will examine narrative, documentary, and aesthetic images. Students will address the following questions: What is photojournalism and how has it evolved? What direction(s) is photojournalism headed? What are the proper roles for the photojournalist? How do images bias the content of editorial copy? How and why do photojournalism and an individual’s right to privacy find themselves in conflict? What is the role of the Photo Editor? How can images emote, captivate, motivate, amuse, inspire, or tell a story in the context of print publications? What ethical questions does photo manipulation present for the practicing photojournalist? In addition to exploring these and other questions, students will critically review the work of past and present photojournalists, and they will create original images as regular assignments. Students need a digital, still camera. Students should be familiar with the rudimentary operation of their photographic equipment; however, course lectures will focus at times on application and technique. This course hopes to enhance the student’s visual literacy and proficiency, enlighten the student on news and photojournalism issues, and introduce the would-be practitioner to the basics of producing successful images. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 238 Mass Media and the Law
Increasingly, the connection between mass media and legal institutions is becoming complex and intertwined. This course will examine the laws that govern mass media in light of the First Amendment and the “Right to Privacy.” Freedom of the press and freedom of expression will be explored. Federal agencies such as the FCC and FTC and their regulatory functions will be presented and discussed. Some attention will be given to cameras in the courtroom and the mass media’s role in covering high profile trials. The political uses of mass media, presidential debates and the increasingly important roles that mass media play in elections will be covered as related topics. In addition to general readings, students will be presented with specific cases for examination. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 242 Electronic Field Production
This course focuses on concepts and techniques associated with Electronic Field Production (EFP). Topics include Electronic News Gathering (ENG), sports coverage, commercials, music videos, and on-location dramatic productions. In ENG work the primary goal is to get the story, however conditions are not always ideal. Special attention will be given to contingency planning and preparation for unforeseen circumstances. Through a combination of planned location shoots and group projects, students will be exposed to principles and practices associated with all aspects of field production. Typically offered every other year. 3 credits

CO 243 Advanced Editing Techniques
Have you ever watched a movie or television show and wondered, “How did they do that?” Modern film and video productions have provided us with the ability to suspend our disbelief as never before, thanks to technology and techniques that make the unbelievable appear believable. This course provides the advanced student with experience using modern digital editing technology to create complex and sophisticated productions. Students taking this course will learn techniques pertaining to continuity editing, acceleration editing, expansion editing, and the manipulation of time through a combination of these techniques. The projects assigned in this course will teach students the functions of special effects, animated graphics and text, keying and compositing, and multi-layer audio postproduction. Special attention is given to postproduction planning and processes. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

CO 244 Television Studio Production
Did you ever wonder what happens behind the scenes of your favorite television shows? Now you can find out by experiencing it first hand. This course will focus on the principles, processes, and techniques associated with television studio production. Topics include planning, writing, producing, directing, lighting, staging, and audio production for television. Students will learn the importance of the pre-production, production, and postproduction phases through a process of rotation, experiencing all positions involved in creating a televised production. Through lectures, demonstrations, and by participating in group projects that involve “hands-on” workshops, students will be exposed to various concepts that emphasize the multiple camera studio production style. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

CO/DR 263 Performance/Rehearsal
Supervised experience in theory classes and practical application through the process of acting in a main stage production of the department. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

CO/DR 267 Playwriting
Theory and practice behind the art of playwriting explored. Students will write a one-act or three-act play. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

CO/DR 358 Directing I
Directing I studies the fundamentals of stage direction. It teaches what theatrical ‘tools’ a director uses to place a playwright’s words into action on the stage. Offered when there is sufficient demand. 3 credits

CO/DR 359 Technical Theatre/Design
How does an artist work to actualize designs on stage? This course attempts to answer this question through study of theory and practice of various production elements: scenery, scene painting, costumes, lighting, design, make-up, properties, and collaboration with other designers and the director. Generally offered every other year. Typically offered every other year. 3 credits

CO 371 Political Communication in the 21st Century
As we enter this 21st Century, a new political system is taking shape in the United States shaped profoundly by the interactive telecommunications revolution. America is increasing turning into an electronic republic and this is transforming our views of democracy and the way we interact with government. Armed with modern technical devices, we have all become instant journalists ready to report and document on any newsworthy event. With the advent of the Internet, web blogging, and “instant” news, communications has been substantially redefined. This course will explore both the opportunities and the dangers ahead for political communications in the electronic information age. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

CO 380 Internship
On-the-job field experience in a specific media environment, these career-oriented placements allow students to test their communication skills while gaining practical experience. Students participating in these internships must keep a daily journal, submit a portfolio of materials produced during the practicum/internship, and submit a final summation/evaluation paper. Credit award is determined in relation to the number of hours the student is involved with the practicum/internship. P: Permission of Depart ment Chair. 3 to 12 credits

CO 385 Drama Workshop/Seminar
The student is required to produce his or her own one-act play or scene from a play in the Act 2 regular season. A student should demonstrate her or his knowledge and mastery for an undergraduate student emphasizing the Performance Communications Sequence. P: Permission of the Chair of the Department. Generally offered every other year. 3 credits

CO/DR 391 Communications Seminar
Communications Seminar serves as a capstone course and is open to Communication majors of senior status. The emphasis is upon crystallizing ethical perspectives on mass media, evaluating the nature of media messages, examining the access to mass media and the control exercised by gatekeepers, and projecting the future trends and issues associated with mass media. P: Senior Status or permission of Department Chair. Generally offered yearly. 3 credits

CO 392 Senior Portfolio
Drawing upon original materials and materials gleaned from Internship experience, the student will compile a portfolio of media materials that are representative of his/her ability to perform as a Communications professional. The Department Chair will administer this portfolio in a tutorial manner. P: Senior Status or permission of Department Chair. 3 credits

CO 393 Senior Thesis
For those Communications majors who have a particular interest in a Communications topic, issue and/or research area, the Senior Thesis is the alternative to the Senior Portfolio. As such, the Senior Thesis is a major paper that is written in a tutorial manner. The Department Chair performs administration of Senior Theses. P: Senior Status or permission of Department Chair. 3 credits

Communications Program: Guidelines for Internships

CO 380 Internship (Minimum of 3 credits)
Communications Internships offer the opportunity for students to be placed at professional, media related sites in either the profit or not-for-profit sectors. These on-the-job experiences allow students to gain “real world” experience and skills while earning college credit. Internships are unpaid unless specifically required by the site offering the internship. Internships in Communications require that the student complete 40 hours of site service for every credit received for the experience.

Students must complete a contract that is secured from the Academic Practica and Internship Coordinator. This contract must be signed and approved by the Chair of the Department of Communications, the site supervisor, and the student engaged in the internship. A copy of this completed contract must be given to all of the above and an additional copy filed with the Office of Academic Affairs. All contracts must be approved, signed and submitted to the above on or before the last day to Add/Drop a class for that particular semester or mod. Failure to meet this deadline may result in an auto­matic withdrawal from being registered for the Internship.

Internships are provided to students through one of several methods:

  1. The Department of Communications maintains a regular listing of sites that have offered Internships in the past. The student may be assigned to a site by the Depart ment Chair./li>
  2. The student may approach the Career Services Office to investigate potential sites.
  3. The student may seek his/her own site location.

Students enrolled in the CO 380—Internship will receive a letter grade at the completion of the Internship. Students will be evaluated upon the following criteria:

  1. A daily journal of activities performed at the Internship and an accurate record of the number of hours engaged in Internship related activities for each day entered in the journal.
  2. A sample of material that the student created or worked on, in some capacity, associated with the Internship.
  3. A Summary/Evaluation paper that the student will write at the end of the internship. These papers are reflective in nature and should include any information that is important in determining a fair letter grade for the Internship.

The above will be due within one week of completing the experiential component associated with the Internship. Internship sites may or may not be visited by the Department Chair of Communications or by another representative of the College. However, the burden for communicating any problems associated with an Internship is upon the student engaged in the Internship. Students in the Communications program may complete more than one internship before degree completion. However, the total number of Internship (CO 380) credits may not exceed 12 credits.